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SIXTH GENERATION

56. Samuel M. Slover (206) Photo was born on 5 Mar 1811 in Mosley Co, Ind.(207) (208)(209) He died on 7 Apr 1872 in Reno, Parker, TX. (96)(210) He has reference number 3M86-5W. He was buried in Goshen Cemetery, Parker Co, TX. (211) From the History of Arkansas,-"Samuel and Emeline (Chote) Slover, the former a Tennessean and the latter a native of South Carolina. During the first settlement of this country, they came here and located in Madison county on King's River. He was a successful farmer and also the proprietor of a dry-goods establishment at Veal's Station and at the time of his death, which occurred in Parker Co., Texas he left a large estate and fortune to be divided among his Family. A Mason, he built the Masonic Hall at Veal's Station and donated it to the Lodge. He was a member of the Methodist church. One of the first settlers of western Texas and at one time, suffered severe losses by having his cattle driven off and killed by Comanche Indians. A life-long Democrat and had three sons in the Confederate Army.

The 1850 Federal census shows the family in Travis County, Texas, Household #391. The surname name is spelled Slovi. He was married to Emeline Choate on 22 Mar 1831 in Madison, AR.

57. Emeline Choate(212) (213)(214) was born on 28 Sep 1816 in South Carolina.(215) (216) She died in 1898 in Texas. (217) She has reference number 57. She was buried in Goshen Cemetery, Parker Co, TX.(218) Emiline Choate was in the 1880 census living with son Ira. She was of Cherokee descent, her parents were born in Tennessee. She appears in the 1880 Wise Co., Tx Census p 248 Enumeration district 132..listed with Ira, Ira, J. and John G. Slover.

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The following affidavit was attached to Emeline Chote Slover Jackson's application for enrollment in the Cherokee Tribe in 1896. The affidavit was typed with corrections made in long hand in the space above, or below, the typed lines of text. Editorial comments are made in italics, plain font, were deemed appropriate, in an attempt to understand the original intent and meaning of Emeline Jackson, and where it is not evidently clear by the combination of lined type written wording and wording written in long hand above or below. (DDC, 4/24/01).

(the font changes did not transfer into the notes in this program - Sammy Williams June 2002)
Affidavit:

Personally appeared before me the undersigned, the witness who subscribes and swears to the following affidavit; and being duly sworn on oath disposes and says; My name is Emmeline Jackson; that I live with my son Wm. Slover, and that his and my post office address is Bowie, Montaque County, Texas. That I am 80 years old and have lived in this county for / years (no number given on original document). That she is a member of the M. E. Church ("South" written above & between "and") and is well known to many people of the Counties of Wise, Parker and Montaque in Texas; being generally called by them Grandma Slover, and not Jackson her present name; she having been married to her last husband, Jackson, after forming their acquaintance. That her maiden name was Emmeline Chote; and that her mother, whose maiden name was Nancy Titsworth, was the daughter of Ben. Titsworth and his wife, whose maiden name was Hunt. That this affiant's mother was married to Sanders Chote, and lived with him on the North Bank of the Hiwassee River in the Cherokee Country; the said Nancy Chote, my mother being to the best of my knowledge and belief a Cherokee by blood, and known and recognized as such. Affiant further says that her parents lived at the place above named for some years after the marriage of her mother to her father, who was a white man,

(The following is confusing as to the intent of the original, the following having been typed and then lined through)

and that there was born to them while living there one son, and that this affiant was born there, or immediately after her parents removed from there to Southern Alabama.

(and hand written above the lined through lines is the following)

and that she was told by her parents that they moved from the Hiwassee River in the Cherokee Nation to Southern Ala.

That said removal was caused, at least in part, by her mother's fear of certain (Cherokees is lined through) Indians; two of them having taken the baby of her father and mother, which child she believes to have been her self, from the cradle with the intention, as her mother believed, to kill it, or abduct it or do it bodily harm; and that at this time her Uncle Silas Chote, being a brother of the father of affiant, and a white man, arrived at the home of the parents of the affiant and drove the said Indians from the place. That said Silas Chote also married a Cherokee wife, and lived in the Cherokee Nation, Ind. Ter. where he died some years ago, leaving numerous descendants, who lived there to (words "the present day" appears to be lined through and written above is:) last heard of. That she has heard her (parents is lined through) mother (written above parents) relate this and has also heard her father tell her mother (nee Nancy Titsworth) that it was said by the neighbors, by way of reproach, that Sanders Chote the father of the affiant, had to steal his wife Nancy (nee Titsworth) away from the Indians-she being a Cherokee Indian.

Affiant further states that her parents removed from Alabama when she was about 14 years old to Washington County, then to Madison County, Arkansas; and that while she lived there in Washington County with her parents she was married to Samuel Slover by whom she has three sons living; to wit Sanders Slover, 61 years old; I. S. Slover, 56 years old; and W. A. Slover, 52 years old; and that after her marriage to said Samuel Slover she and her said husband moved to the State of Texas, where she has lived ever since. That before the war some years her mother visited her (affiant's) Uncle Silas Chote in the Cherokee Country, Indian Territory,

(the following type written lines are lined through, perhaps indicating a change of mind, but a correction for some reason)

for the purpose of securing her just rights; which means, as affiant believes that her said mother went to the Indian Country to get her share of some moneys due her by reason of her being a Cherokee Indian, and a member of the Cherokee Tribe of Indians.

(Hand written and not typed is the following)

and affiant says from the best of her knowledge and belief the above facts are true and correct.
Emmeline (X - indicating her mark) Jackson

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 31st day of August, 1896.
W. E. Tomme, Notary
Public in and for Montaque County, Texas



Children were:

child i. Saunders S. Slover was born on 14 Nov 1835 in War Eagle, Madison, Ark. (219) He died in 1901.
child ii. Henderson Slover(220) was born about 1836 in Arkansas.(221) On page 16 of Descendents of Christopher Choate it says the Henderson Slover was staying with his cousin Isaac Slover in Hayes Co., TX when both joined the Confederate Army. Henderson was never heard of again and no report of his service has been found. It is said that he married a Shadle, sister of the wives of his brothers.
child iii. Mary Jane Slover(222) was born about 1836 in Arkansas.(223)
child iv. Ira Seeman "Bud" Slover(224) (225) was born in 1840. He served in the military between 1861 and 1865 in Civil War. (226) He died on 27 Aug 1909 in Parker County, TX. (227) He served in the military Spring 1861 in Parker County, TX. (228)(229) In the spring of 1861 a party of eleven Indians attacked David Stinson, Budd Slover, John Slover, ---- Boyd, and --- McMahon, a scout from Capt. M. D. Tackett's Company, a few miles north of Jacksboro, but they were speedily repulsed, with the loss of one Indian killed and one wounded. On the next day, William Youngblood, a citizen, was killed and scalped, near his home, by a part of nine Indians. The five rangers named, reinforced by James Gillelland, Ange Price, ---- Parmer and others, pursued and attacked the enemy, and killed a warrior and recovered the scalp of Youngblood, which was conveyed to his late residence in time to be placed in its natural position before the burial.

I.S. Slover is listed in Vol. V of Texas Ranger Service Records 1847 - 1900 Page 111. Shows I.S. was commanded by Capt. M. D. Tackitt in Jack County Rangers or Minute men. Lists time of service and money paid for arms and charged for beef. He was buried in City Greenwood Cemetery, Parker County, TX.
child v. John M. Slover(230) was born in 1842 in Madison Co, Ar. He served in the military on 31 Mar 1862 in Weatherford, TX.(231) Enrolled under Capt. Reuben Sanders Cav. Company. From the Texas State Library Furford's Regt. age 20, height 5' 10 1/2", hair brown. He served in the military Spring 1861 in Parker County, TX.(232) In the spring of 1861 a party of eleven Indians attacked David Stinson, Budd Slover, John Slover, ---- Boyd, and --- McMahon, a scout from Capt. M. D. Tackett's Company, a few miles north of Jacksboro, but they were speedily repulsed, with the loss of one Indian killed and one wounded. On the next day, William Youngblood, a citizen, was killed and scalped, near his home, by a part of nine Indians. The five rangers named, reinforced by James Gillelland, Ange Price, ---- Parmer and others, pursued and attacked the enemy, and killed a warrior and recovered the scalp of Youngblood, which was conveyed to his late residence in time to be placed in its natural position before the burial.

J. M. Slover is listed in Vol. V of Texas Ranger Service Records 1847 - 1900 Page 111. Shows J.M. was commanded by Capt. M. D. Tackitt in Jack County Rangers or Minute men. Lists time of service and money paid for arms and charged for beef.
child28 vi. William Alfred Slover.
child vii. Child #7 Slover(233).
child viii. Child #8 Slover(234).
child ix. Martha Slover(235).